Internet dating violence statistics

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Teen dating abuse is where there is a pattern of violence or threat of violence against a partner and includes verbal, emotional, physical, sexual and digital abuse.

According to the organization Below are a few really real stories about teen dating violence from around the web, from sites like the Huffington Post, People, and Teen Vogue.

While 29 percent of heterosexual youth surveyed reported being physically abused by dating partners, for example, 42.8 percent of LGB youth reported the same.

The rates of sexual victimization for LGB respondents was 23.2 percent, nearly double that of heterosexual youth, of whom 12.3 percent reported sexual coercion.

Teen Dating Violence is a pattern of abusive behavior that someone uses against their partner to cause pain and gain power and control over them.

Forms of Abuse: same as DV Physical – hitting, kicking, punching, slapping, scratching, biting, choking, hair pulling, physically restraining, grabbing, blocking a doorway, poking, pinching, throwing objects, etc.

Financial – using money or resources to control their partner, buying gifts in attempt to keep their partner in the relationship and/or to make up for abusive behavior, making their partner depend on them for food/clothes/rides, etc.

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While we certainly need more research into the reasons for these disparities, it is worth noting that existing curricula on teen dating violence and related topics like sex education or domestic or sexual violence prevention education are rarely inclusive of LGBTQ youth. This lack of inclusiveness allows for the persistence of myths that, for example, men cannot be victims of intimate partner violence, or that women cannot be violent to their partners.

about 10 percent of high school students reported experiencing physical or sexual dating violence.

Unfortunately, most studies of IPV in the LGBTQ community focus exclusively on adults, and most studies of teen dating violence fail to take into account respondents’ sexual orientation or gender identity.

Suggest our 24 hour hotline to them, and offer to sit with them while they call.

Click here for more information on how to help a friend.

While the Urban Institute’s report did not provide much of a discussion of either the causes or effects of LGBTQ teen dating violence, there may be similarities to certain findings among non-LGBTQ youth.

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